Last edited by Dour
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Sustainability of the Himalayan forests found in the catalog.

Sustainability of the Himalayan forests

N. S. Jodha

Sustainability of the Himalayan forests

some perspectives.

by N. S. Jodha

  • 106 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by ICIMOD in Kathmandu .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesICIMOD Mountain Farming Systems Discussion Paper Series -- no.5
ContributionsInternational Centre for Integrated Mountain Development.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18530453M

The Himalayan forest vegetation ranges from tropical dry deciduous forests in the foothills to alpine meadows above timberline (Singh and Singh ). Forest diversity is the main source of livelihood of the people living in Uttaranchal, Central Himalaya. Himalayan Degradation, Colonial Forestry and Environmental Change in India questions the recent trend of treating environmental and agrarian concerns as two separate domains. In this aspect, the book goes beyond the existing framework of environmental history that focuses only on the study of state policies and debates over redefining rights.

Understanding the structure and composition of native forests is a prerequisite in developing an adaptive forest management plan for Himalayan forest ecosystems where climate change is rapid. However, basic information on forest structure and composition are still limited in many places of the Eastern Himalayas. The Himalayan subtropical broadleaf forests is an ecoregion that extends from the middle hills of central Nepal through Darjeeling into Bhutan and also into the Indian States of Uttar Pradesh and represents the east-west-directed band of subtropical broadleaf forest at an altitude of between to 1, m (1, to 3, ft) along the Outer Himalayan Range, and includes several.

The study on “Snow and Glacier Studies” was taken up by the Space Applications Centre, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and executed in collaboration with fourteen research organizations and academic institutions of the country, at the behest of the Ministry of Environment and Forests. Himalayan mountains contain important natural resources of frozen fresh water in the form of. To undertake and promote forestry research, education and extension, leading to scientific and sustainable management of forests, with special focus on Himalayan forests. 2. To provide scientific advice to the central and state governments aiding informed decision making in matters of national and regional importance and international.


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Sustainability of the Himalayan forests by N. S. Jodha Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Forests of Himalaya: Planning and Development: Contents Preface. Himalaya an introduction. Ecotourism in Himalayas. Sustainable development of the Himalayan region. Himalayan subtropical pine forests. Patterns of water potential among forest types of the Central Himalaya.

Thinking beyond dominants. The book is written in the backdrop of the environmental impacts of and future requirements from the natural environment for rapid economic Environmental Sustainability from the Himalayas to the Oceans Struggles and Innovations in China and India social and technological innovation People-forest linkages Himalayan grasslands.

About this book. Himalayan Degradation: Colonial Forestry and Environmental Change in India questions the recent trend of treating environmental and agrarian concerns as two separate domains.

In this aspect, the book goes beyond the existing framework of environmental history that focuses only on the study of state policies and debates over redefining rights and examining protests.

From the Forest to the Sea: The Ecology of Wood in Streams, Rivers, Estuaries and Oceans is a fascinating new scientific work that discusses the role wood plays in very complex and diverse aquatic ecosystems. Until now almost nothing has been published on this little understood topic.

Wood in streams and rivers is a source of food energy for Cited by: Forests provide vital ecosystem services crucial to human well-being and sustainable development, and have an important role to play in achieving the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations Agenda.

Little attention, however, has yet focused on how efforts to achieve the SDGs will impact forests and forest.

This chapter identifies a few technological, policy, and institutional options that may be feasible for the sustainable supply of fuelwood in the mountain communities of the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region of Asia.

Sustainable development in the mountain areas depends on the capacity to develop woodfuel-based energy aimed at fulfilling the energy needs of mountain communities and increasing.

Better forest and land management can contribute up to 20 per cent of the Paris goals, while increasing community and ecosystem resilience, and help bridge this gap.

Strong synergies between SDG 13 and forests can drive investment in sustainable forest management, forest restoration and forest. To make books, we need paper.

To make paper, we need trees. Trees and forests cover almost a third of the world's surfaces. But we are losing them at a rapid rate.

Our sustainability pledges We will source % of our paper sustainably by % of the paper we used in to make our books was Forest Stewardship Council™ (FSC. The nature of terrain imposes severe limitations on the scale of productive activities as well as on the efficiency of infrastructural facilities in the Indian Himalaya.

As a result, biomass based subsistence agriculture constitutes the main source of rural livelihood. During the recent past, rural resource development practices have changed in response to population increase and the resultant. book provides natural and social scientists, engineers, architects, builders and other The Himalayan glaciers, which regulate the water supply to these rivers, are believed to the ethics of sustainability provide the moral authority behind sustainability as a fair and equitable approach to making the world a better place.

ROADMAP TO. The Himalayan Forest The Himalayas, known as the “abode of snow” in Sanskrit, span portions of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, China, Bhutan, Nepal and Tibet.

Parallel mountain ranges spread continuously for 1, miles (2, km), while the total area covered by the Himalayas issquare miles (, square km). Once ecology became a discipline, the concept of sustainability became more inclusive, referring now not just to forests, but to all biological systems.

Ecological sustainability, then, is the ability of an ecosystem to maintain its essential functions and to retain biodiversity over time. Sustainability of the Himalayan ecosystem is crucial for the livelihood of about billion people in Asia.

Natural geological wealth, forestry, wild life, flora, fauna and biodiversity, snow, ice and water bodies, traditional knowledge and mountain agriculture which characterize the region are special. forest rich states for maintenance of their forests. A cceptance of the recommendations of the TFC has resulted in transfer, for the first time in the history of India, of Rs.

1, crores f or the maintenance of e xisting forests, on a pro -rata basis viz. on the basis of recorded area of forests as validated by the F orest Survey of India.

Long-term ecological monitoring on forest ecosystems in Indian Himalayan Region: Criteria and indicator approach Article (PDF Available) in Ecological Indicators () March Sustainability. In ecology, sustainability (from sustain and ability) is the property of biological systems to remain diverse and productive indefinitely.

Long-lived and healthy wetlands and forests are examples of sustainable biological systems. In more general terms, sustainability is the endurance of. The mountainous forests (Sub-Alpine and Alpine forest, the Himalayan Dry Temperate forest and the Himalayan Moist Temperate forests) are more susceptible to the adverse effects of climate change as climate change is projected to be larger for regions that are at higher elevations (Chaturvedi et al., ).

The climate change driven. Forest Survey of India Economic Survey Volume 2 Document: CII, ATOAI, TOFTiger-Sustaining the Wild and Eco-Tourism Society of India submitted to MoEFCC The Hindu Kush Himalayan.

The Himalayas have seen two distinct phases of its rich forest resources. The first phase was the extraction of forests for “development”, which led to widespread deforestation in the region and increased vulnerability to landslides as well as deprivation among people dependent on forests.

The Himalayan subtropical pine forests are a large subtropical coniferous forest ecoregion covering portions of Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Pakistan. This huge pine forest stretches for km across the lower elevations of the great Himalaya range for almost its entire length including parts of Pakistan's Punjab Province in the west through Azad Kashmir, the northern Indian states of Jammu.

A timely and important book, as anyone knows who has travelled to the tropics. Northeastern Naturalist For those interested in 'sustainable use' as something more than a conservation catchphrase, Hunting for Sustainability in Tropical Forests is a must read.

It is a welcome contribution to what is currently a small body of literature detailing the implementation of sustainable use in practice.d.

Forest biodiversity in national strategies and action plans 31 e. Access and benefit-sharing 33 f. Communication, education and public awareness 35 III. Resources Suggestions for training sessions in sustainable forest management 37 CBD Programme of Work on forest biodiversity   The lower hills and foothills of the Indian Himalayas are densely populated owing to the fact that the Himalayan Rivers have made the soils here rich and fertile.

On the other hand, in the Greater and Trans Himalayan regions, including Leh-Ladakh and Lahaul Spiti, of extreme climatic conditions and difficult terrain, the population is sparse.